Grading on a Curve

Grading on a Curve

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When I met my son’s engineering professor about 12 years ago, he told me that he never grades on a curve. When I asked him why, he answered “Because no one wants to be driving across the bridge or riding on the elevator built by the kid who got a C on the curve.” Diversity, […]

Parents, Participate!

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When parents and school personnel build partnerships, the benefits can extend beyond the classroom.  These partnerships can take several forms: involvement or engagement.  According to the author of Building Parent Engagement in Schools, the main distinction between the two terms is telling versus listening. “ A school striving for family involvement often leads with its mouth—identifying projects, needs, and […]

Reading Comprehension: Digital or Paper?

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A previous blog post on active learning presented evidence from several research studies indicating that the “low tech” method of handwriting notes provides certain advantages over the high tech note-taking on tablets and computers.  Handwriting notes enhanced the cognitive process, thus resulting in better retention. “The slower hand movements involved in writing allow the note-taker […]

The Case for Classic Literature

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A war is waging in English departments around the country regarding the literature syllabus: Should teachers follow the canon of classical literature or encourage student choice of young adult or graphic novels? Choice supports student autonomy and self determination. On the other hand, Classics extend cognitive skills, improve vocabulary, writing, and reasoning skills.Some educators believe […]